Broccoli & Bull

Tomorrow we are having a multicultural fair at school and many of my students did not have the projects they were creating in Mrs. B’s class ready for display. When it came time for lunch recess those kids were not free to go. Despite the fact that they and Mrs. B. stayed in my classroom to work, I microwaved my lunch and sat down at my desk to eat.

From clear across the room Moe snapped around to stare at me. “Broccoli!” he shrieked. “I hate broccoli.” I speared a piece of the lovely green stuff on my fork and waved it at him, “Get your project done or this is what you’re having for lunch.”

Rico immediately jumped up and said, “I’ll eat it!”

I said, “Rico, this is a punishment. I would have to feed you something you didn’t like.”

He eyed my plate, wiggled his eyebrows and said, “I hate beef. I hate beef a lot. In fact, I hate it so much,” he pointed at my plate, “that you’d really be punishing me if you gave me that big piece right there.”

16 thoughts on “Broccoli & Bull

  1. OC — not Rico. His dad is a butcher. Some of the kids though — yeah, for sure. I am surprised by how many of them don’t like meat, and when I ask why they say things that let me know they don’t have it very often.

  2. Melli — those kids are always up to something. They keep me on my toes.
    Mumma — apparently meat eating makes one sneaky and cunning.
    Venus — smart-mouthy!
    Kat — yes. He returned in the pink of health the next day — and has yet to turn in any of those missing assignments, despite his mother’s promise that she’d ground him until he did.
    Morgan — my 5th grade teacher added cigarettes to that mix. Coffee, cigarettes and chalk. I hated her breath so badly I never raised my hand to ask for help. As a teacher I keep breath mints handy at all times!

  3. 🙂 You really make me feel as thouh I am in the classroom with you. Boys are always hungry no matter what you feed them it wouldn’t be punishment(!) Love the post.

  4. Quilly…I hope you had a good time at the fair today. Special days always make a great change of pace; like a miny holiday. In Canada the kids are having a long weekend (four days). Workers get Monday off…The Queen’s birthday, you know. TTFN (“Ta Ta for now.” in the Queen’s English and “Bye for now.” in Canadian English……….Judy

  5. Pauline — we could test that theory. I could cook them some liver and onions.

    Nessa — these kids learn it early in self-defense.

    Polona — a future used car salesman.

    Diesel — and if not a used car salesman, perhaps a politician.

    Judy — hot, tired, sweaty — the kids had a blast. I need a nap.

    Silverneurotic — this was pre-lunch, by about 15 minutes.

    Dr. John — I think a lot more kids would come up with stuff like this if more self-expression was encouraged.

Comments are closed.