Jientje’s 1000 Words Photo Challenge

Jientje, our mistress of fun, has cooked up a wonderful photo challenge, and this is what she has to say about it:

When I was a kid, I was always fascinated by the colourful language my grandmother used. She had such a way with words, she had her own funny ways to describe things and that memory still makes me smile. As long as people have been around, they have tried to communicate with each other. As a means of getting the message across as clearly as possible, idioms and sayings have found their way into our language.

Now, because a picture paints a thousand words, I thought it would be nice to make this a new photo challenge. The idea is to pick an idiom, or a saying, ( even slang is allowed) and illustrate it with a picture. Each week we’ll cover two letters of the alphabet, okay?

If “language is the dress of thoughts” ( Johnson), then idioms must the wardrobe …

And so we continue ….

Week Seven: M & N

MINCE WORDS

People who “mince words”, never say quite what they mean. They hint or allude to something, but never come right out and say it. If one is asked not to mince words, their listener is requesting a simple, direct, statement of fact. Many [most?] politicians are well known for mincing words.

~*~

NOT PLAYING WITH A FULL DECK

Saying that someone’s “not playing with a full deck” is a euphemistic (word mincing) way of calling them crazy.

“Hey, LeRoy, did ya hear ’bout Joe Bob?”
“No, Elroy, I didn’t. What happened to Joe Bob?”
“Dern fool dropped a lit match in his gas tank.”
“Gee criminy! What’n tarnation did he go an do that for?”
“He wanted to see how much gas he had left.”
“I always knew that ol’ boy weren’t playin’ with a full deck.”
“Yep, an now he’s got even fewer cards then he had before.”

~*~

If you liked this, you can see what the other players have come up with by stopping by Jientje’s, Heaven is in Belgium, and clicking on the links. If you really liked this, grab your camera and play along! Jientje is one heck of a hostess and a good time will be had by all!

Jientje’s 1000 Words Photo Challenge

Jientje, our mistress of fun, has cooked up a wonderful photo challenge, and this is what she has to say about it:

When I was a kid, I was always fascinated by the colourful language my grandmother used. She had such a way with words, she had her own funny ways to describe things and that memory still makes me smile. As long as people have been around, they have tried to communicate with each other. As a means of getting the message across as clearly as possible, idioms and sayings have found their way into our language.

Now, because a picture paints a thousand words, I thought it would be nice to make this a new photo challenge. The idea is to pick an idiom, or a saying, ( even slang is allowed) and illustrate it with a picture. Each week we’ll cover two letters of the alphabet, okay?

If  “language is the dress of thoughts”  ( Johnson), then idioms must the wardrobe …

And so we continue ….

Week Six: K & L


Know When To Hold’em, Know When To Fold’em

This one comes to us from the early history of America and the days of riverboat gambling and the wild, wild west.  It simply means one needs to know when to quit.  I think Kenny Rogers said it best:

*

Lucky in Love

See that look in his eyes?  He was looking at me.  Does this one really need explanation?

~*~

If you liked this, you can see what the other players have come up with by stopping by Jientje’s, Heaven is in Belgium, and clicking on the links. If you really liked this, grab your camera and play along! Jientje is one heck of a hostess and a good time will be had by all!

Jientje’s 1000 Words Photo Challenge

Jientje, our mistress of fun, has cooked up a wonderful photo challenge, and this is what she has to say about it:

When I was a kid, I was always fascinated by the colourful language my grandmother used.  She had such a way with words, she had her own funny ways to describe things and that memory still makes me smile. As long as people have been around, they have tried to communicate with each other. As a means of getting the message across as clearly as possible, idioms and sayings have found their way into our language.

Now, because a picture paints a thousand words, I thought it would be nice to make this a new photo challenge. The idea is to pick an idiom, or a saying, ( even slang is allowed) and illustrate it with a picture. Each week we’ll cover two letters of the alphabet, okay?

If  “language is the dress of thoughts” ( Johnson), then idioms must the wardrobe …

And so we continue ….

Week Two: C & D

Cutting Edge

If something is said to be “on the cutting edge” it is the latest, greatest, most modern or most sophisticated item of it’s kind on the market, be it actual goods (especially automotive or electronic), or bold new ideas, or advances in modern science.  Usually something “on the cutting edge” is breaking new ground (like the cutting edge of a plow).

Don’t Count Your Chickens Before They’re Hatched

“Don’t count your chickens before they’re hatched” is a warning against acting prematurely and is often used when someone speaks of spending money they’ve not yet earned.   This phrase is also used when someone makes plans on an outcome as yet undecided, like planning a victory parade before the battle is even engaged.

~*~

If you liked this, you can see what the other players have come up with by stopping by Jientje’s, Heaven is in Belgium, and clicking on the links. If you really liked this, grab your camera and play along! Jientje is one heck of a hostess and a good time will be had by all!

Jientje’s One Thousand Words Photo Challenge

Jientje, our mistress of fun, has cooked up a new photo challenge, and this is what she has to say about it:

When I was a kid, I was always fascinated by the colourful language my grandmother used.  She had such a way with words, she had her own funny ways to describe things and that memory still makes me smile. As long as people have been around, they have tried to communicate with each other. As a means of getting the message across as clearly as possible, idioms and sayings have found their way into our language.

Now, because a picture paints a thousand words, I thought it would be nice to make this a new photo challenge. The idea is to pick an idiom, or a saying, ( even slang is allowed) and illustrate it with a picture. Each week we’ll cover two letters of the alphabet, okay?

And so we start ….

Week One:  A & B

An Ace Up His Sleeve

Idiom

If you have an ace up your sleeve, the implication is that you have a hidden asset which may,
or may not,
be legal and above board.
In the wild west gambling halls, if someone was caught with an ace up his sleeve,
he was shot first and questioned later.

Buttons & Bows

metaphor
metaphor

If you’re all dressed up in buttons and bows, you are wearing your fanciest duds.
Gram used to tell me to get into my “buttons and bows”
when she wanted me to dress for church or some fancy occasion.
The metaphor is also the title of a song first published in 1947
and can be listened to on Youtube as sung by Gene Autry.

Buttons & Bows, Gene Autry

If you liked this, you can see what the other players have come up with by stopping by Jientje’s, Heaven is in Belgium, and clicking on the links. If you really liked this, grab your camera and play along! Jientje is one heck of a hostess and a good time will be had by all!