Wasabi & Whine II

My report cards are done. Done! Yay! Now I can just relax and have fun with the kids these last few days.

Fourth Period –

General Comments:

  • They must be good for us. They taste too nasty to be junk food.
  • Tastes like farts.
  • Rabbit poop. Green rabbit poop.

Odd Behavior:

  • Bert & Lupe, asking me for more not because they like them, but because they want to take them home and feed them to their brothers.

Conversation:

“It’s some kind of breakfast cereal.”

“Yeah, the gross kind.”

Fifth Period (my homeroom class)

General Comments:

  • “Looks like chewed up bubble gum.”
  • “Tastes like fish food.”
  • “It’s dried guacamole balls!”
  • “I feel like I just ate a bomb. My tummy is warm.”

Odd Behavior:

  • Mo grabbed his throat, made gagging noises, fell over on the floor and yelled, “She’s killed me! She’s killed me!”
  • Izzy grabbed Jake, pulled him away from the drinking fountain and started gulping water.

Conversation:

Pansy: “They can’t be all bad, Jimmy likes them.”

Cyndi: “Yeah, but he liked the liver, too. Remember?”

Pansy: “I always thought there was something weird about him.”

_____________

Today the students will share their wasabi projects. Their assignment was to name the product, develop a slogan for it, and write a magazine ad. Stay tuned for further fun and mayhem.

11 thoughts on “Wasabi & Whine II

  1. I don’t know where I was, but I thought I left a comment. I swear I even saw the comment posted. I am truely living in a world of my own making.

    So any hoo, I don’t care for Wasabi peas either, although I do like the dried peas if they are just salted.

    I ope you have pictures. This is a great project.

    Schools almost out and then you’ll be on a new adventure. Yipee! I am so excited for you.

  2. Quilly…..Wouldn’t chocolate covered ants have been a hoot? But, you couldn’t have told them what it was until AFTER the tasting.

    I hope somebody is helping you pack………………Judy

  3. Tell your kids, Quilly, that wasabi peas are a delicacy over here in Hawai’i. Together with raw fish. Oh, and Korean barbeque. Complete with copious amounts of raw garlic.

    And I just discovered a claim that “wasabi” in most American situations is actually an imitation. Complete with a dye based on, in some cases, Spirulina, the “miracle food” blue-green alga that might, just might, be putting people at risk for Alzheimer’s. Guess what I’m not having any of …

  4. Wasabi scares me. I had just a teeny tiny bit last summer when I was eating sushi (who knew they sold sushi at a hospital cafeteria)…and omg, I thought they were gonna have to admit me to the CICU!

  5. Glad the reports are done.

    My fave comment from this lot: “They must be good for us. They taste too nasty to be junk food.” Too true!

  6. Pauline — I’ll be sharing some soon. I wish I could have video taped this. Some of the presentations were a hoot.

    Nessa — I am excited too, but between me and my new adventure is one heck of a lot of work!

    Kat — one of the advantages of being a teacher is a fresh batch of kids to torment every year.

    Judy — I do this assignment every year and never tell them what it is until after they have written their own commericals. Chocolate covered ants would be fun, but they aren’t in my budget.

    Jackie — crunchy and no fat, they’d fit right in to your dietary needs, and they have lots of flavor! Although having read OC’s comment, you might want to check the package labels very carefully!

    Silverneurotic — wasabi has a way of doing that.

    Dr. John — I don’t think my students are any more creative then the next teacher’s. I think I just give them permission to be a little more daring. It is safe to take chances in my classroom because original thought and effort are more important then success. (We learn more from our failures then from our easy accomplishments).

    Mumma — that one made me chuckle, too.

    Doug — I know it is subversive, but I just can’t help myself.

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