Reflect This #3 & Ruby Tuesday

Reflect This:

Peacock Feather

Peacock Feather

This is a half of a peacock feather. Mating season is over — in fact the new chicks are half grown! — and the male peacocks are dropping their feathers. Indeed, they’re looking more than a little motley right now and they seem to know it. Their heads aren’t as high as usual and their call isn’t half as loud as it can be.

Now, if you are saying to yourself, “That doesn’t look like a half of peacock feather. I can see both sides!” first, stop talking to yourself, then — second — look again. That is half a peacock feather tucked into the frame of the mirror. All you see here but that one-half of feather is the reflection in the mirror (including the other half of the feather).

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Our Ruby Tuesday host is Mary, the Teach.

On Tuesdays you can post any photo you like (it must be one of your own) that contains the color RED. Your photo can contain lots of RED or a little bit of RED.

Lanai Tomatoes

Lanai Tomatoes

These little babies were growing on my lanai. I picked them, washed them and we very much enjoyed them in our salad. These are the second set of tomatoes we picked from this plant, the third set is just starting to blush — and the plant is blooming again! I loves me some home grown tomatoes!

Ruby Tuesday With Dragons

Our Ruby Tuesday host is Mary, the Teach.

On Tuesdays you can post any photo you like (it must be one of your own) that contains the color RED. Your photo can contain lots of RED or a little bit of RED.

Manoa Chinese Cemetary

Manoa Chinese Cemetery

This is the entrance to the Manoa Chinese Cemetery, one of the most beautiful spots on the island. The Chinese call this place, “The Heart of the Dragon” and the first Chinese settlers declared it sacred. Here is where they wanted to be buried, because it is as close as they would ever be to China again.

Today the cemetery is the equivalent of a very exclusive country club. Only members of the very best families are permitted residence. And even within the cemetery there are divisions, or “clans” and it is family membership which determines where one is buried.

Dragon Gate

Dragon Gate

Melli asked for dragons. These sit above the Dragon Gate in Manoa Chinese Cemetery. They are just one small example of the exquisite art which can be found upon the grounds. Please click on the images and make them larger.

Ruby Cock-a-Tuesday-Doo!

Our Ruby Tuesday host is Mary, the Teach.

On Tuesdays you can post any photo you like (it must be one of your own) that contains the color RED. Your photo can contain lots of RED or a little bit of RED.

Rooster

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This fella was strutting around and through an open air restaurant. Lanai dining is popular here in Hawaii and all that food attracts wildlife. It is not at all unusual for birds and cats to congregate at such establishments, though the birds are usually Bulbuls and Brazilian Cardinals.

My Previous Ruby Tuesday Posts

Ruby Tuesday — Hibiscus

Our Ruby Tuesday host is Mary, the Teach.

On Tuesdays you can post any photo you like (it must be one of your own) that contains the color RED. Your photo can contain lots of RED or a little bit of RED.

Red Hibiscus

Red Hibiscus

For some reason the red hibiscus seem to be a much more fragile flower than most of the other hibiscus cultivars.  It is rare to find a red hibiscus fresh and crisp and new.  Usually they hang, somewhat whithered, pointing toward the ground.

We had a week of late afternoon and evening rain showers, and on the third day I stepped into the morning to be greeted by this beauty and all of her sisters, bright and fresh and a new.  I snapped her picture just for you.

Quetzaltenango, Guatemala …

… one of the greenest places on God’s green Earth. I went there in 2002 with my pastor and a group of other wonderful people. Ours was a medical mission. I have few first aid skills, so I was put to work fetching, carrying and entertaining the children while their families waited to see the doc, or pharmacist. I also manned the supply room from time to time. Each child was given school supplies, toothbrush, toothpaste and a toy of some kind. Each adult was given a hygiene packet (soap, shampoo, toothbrush, toothpaste, deodorant, comb, towel, wash cloth).

Our little outreach group also did our fair share to stimulate the economy. We all came home with wonderful treasures. My favorite is this coat.

traditional hand woven pattern

traditional hand woven pattern

I purchased the coat for $20.00 American dollars, which at the time was worth about 160 quetzals (Guatemalan dollars). It is made with a combination of denim and local hand woven cotton.

front

front

back

back

The craftmanship is superb and the detail is exquisite. The coat was made by war widows. Sewing and weaving is how they support their families. The idea was put forward by their local United Methodist Church and space for a store was provided. The woman formed a co-op. They make and sell handcrafted clothing, jewelry, household items (potholders, placemets, table clothes, etc) and art. They have built their own community where they live and work together, using the money from the store to purchase supplies, feed and care for their own families — and do missionary work among those less fortunate than they.

sleeve

sleeve

Years of civil war has left Guatemala with a decimated population. Men and boys were taken by their homes at gun point and forced to join either the national army, or the guerrilla force (depending upon who captured them). Refusing to fight was an automatic death sentence. One was either enemy or ally. There was no neutral ground.

inner pocket detail

The coat is padded and heavy. The likelihood of my ever wearing it in Hawaii is slim. In fact, I believe the last time I wore it was just about a year ago, one chilly night in Friday Harbor, Washington when I walked with OC to the point, where every evening he played his trumpet while the sun set and the moon rose.

I keep the coat because of it’s beauty. Because of the memories it holds. And to remind me how blessed I am to live in the United States where I take things like plentiful food, clean water, electricity, death from natural causes, and my freedom to choose my own course in life for granted.

This post was prompted in part by David McMahon, of Authorblog, who asked: Do you have an article of clothing you haven’t worn for more than a year? And by Mary, The Teach, at Work of the Poet, who hosts, Ruby Tuesday.