Blood Pressure Whoas

They sat down to a lovely roast pork dinner She had cooked.

He:  “Mmmmm, Kalua Pig!  I’m afraid I am getting to the age where meals like this are going to have to be a rare occurrence.  Time to start watching my cholesterol and blood pressure.”

She, pausing with her fork half way to her mouth:  “Is this an ‘in general’ thing, or do we have specific cause for concern?”

He: “Last time we checked everything was within normal bounds for a man my age.  I’m just saying we should work at keeping it that way.”

She, relaxing:  “Okay.  And really, we should both be eating more fish and chicken anyway.”

He: “I totally agree.”

She: “But when I feed you only fish and chicken for a week, you complain.”

He:  “I know, but I guess I am just going to have to get used to it.”

She:  “All right.  I guess that leaves what I planned for tomorrow’s meal out.  I wish we’d had this conversation before I shopped.”

He: “Why?  What were you going to fix tomorrow?”

She waved her fork at the roast:  “Look at the size of this thing.  I planned on taking the meat off the bone and making enchiladas.”

He: “Enchiladas?  Did I mention that my cholesterol and blood pressure are within the normal range for a man my age?”

She: “What if the enchiladas tip you over the edge?”

He: “You can serve chicken on Wednesday.”

Stumbling Toward Heaven

One wouldn’t expect a book about cancer to be a laugh-out-loud read, but this one is. In Stumbling Toward Heaven: Cancer, Crashes and Questions, Mike Hamel takes us through his struggles with cancer, God, and the aftermath of his auto accident. This a true story told with unusual candor and brilliant insights, and it isn’t just a book for cancer patients.  If you or anyone you love have ever suffered a life altering catastrophe or struggled over questions of God’s will in your life, you will find this book a heart and soul stirring read.

~*~

It is time for a FIRST Wild Card Tour book review! If you wish to join the FIRST blog alliance, just click the button. We are a group of reviewers who tour Christian books. A Wild Card post includes a brief bio of the author and a full chapter from each book toured. The reason it is called a FIRST Wild Card Tour is that you never know if the book will be fiction, non~fiction, for young, or for old…or for somewhere in between! Enjoy your free peek into the book!

You never know when I might play a wild card on you!

 

Today’s Wild Card author is:

 

 

and the book:

 

Stumbling Toward Heaven: Cancer, Crashes and Questions

CreateSpace (March 24, 2011)

***Special thanks to Mike Hamel for sending me a review copy.***

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:


Mike Hamel is the author of a dozen books and a cancer survivor who lives and writes in the shadow of Pikes Peak in Colorado Springs.

Visit the author’s website.

 

SHORT BOOK DESCRIPTION:

Stumbling Toward Heaven is about my struggle with cancer in particular and life in general. It describes in detail what the disease has done to my body and what life before and during treatment has done to my mind, which has never been very stable in the first place. It follows my physical and spiritual journey toward the Valley of the Shadow of Death and beyond. It’s written for everyone who has been impacted by life-threatening catastrophes.

This book is also meant for those who find themselves spiritually “off the reservation” as novelist and cancer survivor Kinky Friedman would say. For a long time I’ve been “out where the (church) buses don’t run”—another Kinkyism—and it’s surprising how many people have wandered out here for one reason or another.

On May 16th, TV News 5 (Colorado) ran a story about Mike. Click HERE to see the interview!

 

Product Details:

List Price: $14.99
Paperback: 270 pages
Publisher: CreateSpace (March 24, 2011)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1461005000
ISBN-13: 978-1461005001

AND NOW…THE FIRST CHAPTER:

Good News, It’s Cancer!

July 2, 2008
“I have good news,” Dr. Dillon said, leaning forward on his elbows. “You have cancer. The biopsy shows the lump in your abdomen is Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and not an omental tumor as the initial scan suggested.”

Lymphoma is good news indeed. The first time I’d seen the good doctor a few weeks earlier he’d said, “You have a nonspecific mass in your omentum.”

“I didn’t even know I had an omentum,” I replied.

“It’s a fatty covering in the abdomen.”

“How big is the mass?” (“Mass” sounds more benign that “tumor.”)

“About the diameter of a grapefruit,” he said, making a circle with thumbs and forefingers. “The nearby lymph nodes are also enlarged.”

Dr. Dillon had no idea how long the tumor had been growing. I got introduced to it in the spring of 2008. I was getting low-grade cramps after sitting at my computer all day, which I put down to poor posture. Then I woke up two nights in a row with abdominal pain I couldn’t blame on posture or indigestion. That’s when I first felt the hardness in my gut.

The cramps went away about the time I made an appointment with my family physician but the lump remained. I remember kneading my gut on the way to the doctor’s trying to rekindle the pain that had caused me to make the appointment in the first place. Turns out I didn’t have to worry about wasting the doctor’s time; he could feel the abnormality and wouldn’t buy my glib explanation that it was my abs of steel.

“It’s only hard on one side,” he pointed out.

“Okay,” I conceded, “How about ab of steel?”

“How about you get a CT scan,” he countered.

The scan revealed a mass large enough to warrant an immediate trip to a surgeon/oncologist, which is how I wound up at Dr. Dillon’s.

Larry Dillon is a personable man with salt-and-pepper hair, an open face and straightforward manner. During our first visit he had explained to my wife, Susan, and me that the normal course of treatment is a complete surgical resection of the omentum. Before we left he warned about doing research on the Internet because the information on solid omental tumors “will scare you silly.”

He got that right.

I had no problem finding authoritative articles on omental masses. I had hoped it was something Catholics attended during Lent, but no such luck. An article on eMedicine clinically stated that, “Patients with primary malignant tumors of the omentum have a median survival time of only six months. Only 10-20% of patients are alive two years after surgical excision.”1

The word that popped out at me was “survival,” a stark concept for a fifty-six-year-old who had seldom been sick and who had only been in a hospital as a visitor. Till now my closest brushes with mortality had been conducting funerals as a pastor. All that was about to change. Since then I’ve been in and out of hospitals, clinics and doctor’s offices. I have gone from a high-energy to a high-maintenance lifestyle; from avoiding even aspirin to popping up to twenty pills a day and having lethal doses of toxic chemicals injected directly into my chest.
Scan This, Biopsy That

The transition from diagnosis (determining what’s wrong with a person), to prognosis (discerning how a disease will progress), is facilitated by a plethora of tests. It was a CT scan that sent me to Dr. Dillon. He in turn ordered a biopsy of the mass in my abdomen.

Computed Axial Tomography, aka CAT or CT scan, was invented in 1972 by a British engineer and a South African physicist, both of whom later received Nobel Prizes for their contributions to medicine and science. Tomos is Greek for “slice” and graphia means “without a knife.” The CT scan uses X-rays and computers to examine the body in 3-D, which sure beats exploratory surgery! It allows radiologists to see diseases and abnormalities that, in the past, could only be found by surgeons—or coroners. Thankfully, the procedure is painless, unless you count drinking the contrast solution, which tastes like banana-flavored chalk.

I reported to Memorial Hospital on June 26 for my tumor biopsy. I remember talking to a nurse named Tammy while on the examination table and the next thing I knew I was in the recovery room an hour later. Thanks to the wonders of modern medicine and the skills of top-flight professionals, I can truly say the process was painless.

As I looked at my stomach after the biopsy, I noticed the “x” they made before the procedure was an inch below the actual cut. I pointed this out to Tammy, who explained that they’d marked me while I was holding my breath during the scan. Once I was under, I relaxed, hence the change in location. There went my hopes of a malpractice suit. Actually, I was impressed at how personable and professional the medical personnel have treated me) an observation that has held true throughout my treatment).

All I have to show for the biopsy the next day is a small bruise and a slight soreness. I feel pretty upbeat but I’m careful not to get too exuberant or else I’ll pay the price. To an extent, I believe Newton’s Third Law also applies to emotions: “For every feeling, there is an equal and opposite feeling.” Like other natural forces, emotions come finely balanced on a shifting fulcrum.

The hardest part of this ordeal so far has been telling family and friends and hearing the concern and tears in their voices. The possibility of a shortened life hasn’t registered on me yet. I’m not trying to suppress my feelings; they just haven’t gotten too worked up.

Obviously God has entered my thoughts but this crisis hasn’t suddenly cured my inability to pray. For a few years now I’ve suffered from the loss of a sense of God’s presence and shed my evangelical worldview. I’ve been adrift in a spiritual Sargasso Sea, which may have contributed to my getting sick. More on this later.

* * *

“Cancer is a word, not a sentence.”

—John Diamond

Same Song, Different Virus

Sick again.  Weak trembling.  Spending too much time with john — but at least I have royal seating.

Today a new symptom assailed me — swollen joints.  My knees, elbows and knuckles are puffy, stiff and sore. And an old symptom remains — the stuffy nose and congested lungs.

I am achy and sore and miserable. My eyes burn and even my hair hurts.   You all play nice without me while I crawl into a corner and sleep.

Just keep it down please.

Taking Your Medicine

She: “You remembered to bring home the pills the doctor gave you?”

He: “Yes, dear. They’re right here.”

She: “Good. The medical people expect you to follow their instructions to the letter, and I’m here to make sure that you do that.”

He: “OK, I think. God give me the strength …”

She: “Of course I’m a blessing to you! Now here’s your first pill. Put it in your mouth.”

He: “Can’t I take a hacksaw to it first?”

She: “It’s not that big. Go on. Ah. Now spit it out.”

He:Whaa …??

She: “You heard me. Spit it out!

He: “But what good is that supposed to do?”

She: “The good that comes from following the instructions!

He: “Following .. the .. instructions ..”

She: “Look. They’re right on the packet. You can read ’em just as well as I can. ‘Take one pill twice daily until gone.’ You gotta save this one for dinnertime, when you take it again.”

He: “And so on until, like, August? Hon, surely you’ve heard about the difference between the spirit and the letter of the law?”

She: “Yes?”

He: “Well, then, may I suggest that, unless you wish me to become a spirit, we ignore the letter of this law and let me swallow the dam pill!”

Don’t Call Search & Rescue

Yes, I know we went missing.  Our bad.  The problem started when my blog host went offline.  While it was down we left the island.  Amoeba had to see the doc about a mole on his lip.  The doc took the mole and left Amoeba with a really big bandage on his face.  That is why we couldn’t be found.

We are home now, but going to bed.  I have poked pain killers in Amoeba and he is kind of spacey. I need to get him to lay down before he falls down.

While you’re waiting for me to wake up and visit your blogs, Facebook did manage to upload the entire Watermelon Man video. This is the One More Time Band playing at The Rumor Mill in Friday Harbor, Washington. Amoeba is playing the trumpet solo with the plunger mute. You can also see this on Facebook.